Marijuana Use Ups the Risk of Abusing More Potent Drugs

For Michael Murtaugh, who spent his adolescence consuming drugs, running has provided a new lease of life. According to him, “running is still legal in all the 50 states of America,” which is not the case as far as smoking pot is concerned. In fact, the latter has the Sigma Vape Shop nation divided.

Furthermore, the pursuance of a “runner’s high” hardly costs anything, while indulgence in substance abuse could invariably lead to job loss, incarceration, ill health, or in some cases even death. There is no such risk involved when one gets a natural “endorphin rush” from a run.

Michael’s story is no different from the countless other victims of “pot” and “alcohol.” Many like him experiment with drugs and other substances to mask the pain of a childhood abuse. Some may inadvertently get into drug abuse due to the early exposure to drugs by family members, friends, etc.

With the legalization of recreational pot use, serious concerns have been raised over the impact of such a significant change over adolescents. The change will not only lower the perception of risk of marijuana among youngsters, but also encourage them to indulge in marijuana abuse. In the light of such a landmark shift in the domain of substance abuse, it is time to reflect upon the repercussions on adolescents.

Adolescence and substance abuse

Adolescence and substance abuse are often closely linked, which increases the likelihood of developing lasting changes in the neural pathways of the brain. That could exacerbate the habit, leading to a deadly addiction. Considering such a close relationship, any kind of leeway has the potential to increase the rate of substance abuse and developing mental disorders.

As marijuana is a gateway drug, the probability that its prolonged use leading to experimenting with hard stuff, such as heroin and meth, is quite high. This has been corroborated by the ordeal of Michael, who started smoking pot at a relatively young age of 11 and eventually took to drinking alcohol and doing harder stuff, such as cocaine and meth. At 45, a drug weary Michael realized that he needed a new lease of life, one that would not make him a prisoner of drugs. Thereafter, it has been a long and arduous journey toward reform and sobriety.

With increasing public support for marijuana laws more than before, it has become essential to discuss the social and health-related consequences. The increased social acceptance can become a driving force behind the rise in substance abuse and drug-impaired driving. Of all, the tendency to experiment with harder drugs can pose a major problem for youngsters.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *